So about that early access…

It’s still in the works, and we’re getting closer, but while we do that, we wanted to give you a status update.

Why the delay?

We have reviewed our launch plan and decided that the early access game should be as close to the final release as possible, without giving away any of the plot. So we went to work on improving character appearance, mission generation, and map creation. Let’s break that down in some detail.

Character appearance

We switched the characters and clothes from using traditional materials to PBR (physically-based rendering), making them look better in-game. Character rendering performance was another major area of focus for us.

We also improved the fit of clothes, and enabled wardrobe management for playable characters. Now you’ll be able to choose from dozens of items your Commander and the squad members can wear.

In the same vein, we’ve added some more animations and made some improvements to character skinning, again, making them look more realistic.

And finally, the Spy DNA squad is complete, with finished models, and back stories.

Mission generation

Same mission, different map? We don’t think so. That means that we need a way to create unique combinations from some smaller “elementary particles” that make up a mission.

We have created a number of scenarios that are similar from the tactical point of view, and the game will fill in the (compatible) details randomly, whenever a mission is generated. To take a simple example, the generic mission could be “hostage rescue.” The details that would be filled in and used to generate a mission can be: number and appearance of hostages and enemies, skill levels of hostages and enemies, geographic location (rural, suburban, urban, etc.), and any constraints – say, the area is full of civilians and you shouldn’t kill any of them, or cause a panic.

2017-08-01 (1).png

Next, we introduced infiltration. Most of the new missions that pop up, will have an infiltration option, and the Commander will decide which of the squad members will go. In the hostage scenario from above, the infiltration options could be: sneaking up to the building and placing a surveillance camera or microphone, hiding a weapons stash, or going in as a commercial hostage negotiator.

If the infiltration succeeds, the mission itself will be somewhat easier to complete, and if it doesn’t, your mission may turn into a rescue operation really quickly.

Map creation

Now of course, we need some maps to match the diverse missions. We’re working on creating landscapes and populating them with trees and buildings, as well as all the other things that go on a map: street signs, cars, fences, etc. both to provide a bit of visual appeal, and cover/line of sight obstruction.

When?

You have been very patient with us so far, so we decided that while we are finishing up the Early Access release, we’ll be shipping another demo version shortly, to show the progress we’ve made. Please stay tuned – we’ll be announcing it here on the blog, and on social media of course.

Getting ready for Early Access

It’s been a heads-down month here getting ready for early access. I’ll talk about what we are doing to go from demo to a full game. The transition from demo to full game for us has been about adding progression and content. 

The first big change is the result of a mission now affects your game. You can now also train your team at the base. Wounded characters will need some time to heal at the base before they are available for future missions. We’ve implemented the save game system and made the full character roster available. It’s all pretty obvious stuff, but it still needed to get done. 

While on mission, a character can advance their skills by using them in the field. On the skills page you will now see a count of how many times that skill has been used. Each use will improve the skill. 

The amount of the improvement will depend on several factors. First, each skill has associated attributes which govern how well your character can learn the skill. These are separate, though possibly overlapping, from the attributes which bias the ability to use the skill. For example “mental motivation” is a factor in learning most skills, however, it is used in few skill checks. These determine the character’s learning rate modifier for that skill. 

In addition each skill has a base learn rate to adjust for skills that are used frequently vs rarely. For example we don’t want to penalize hacking and lockpicking progress just because there are fewer chances to use the skill. 

Back at the base, skill training is a passive activity. You can assign each character two skills (primary and secondary) to train. Then as each day passes, any characters at the base that are healthy, will train those skills. So characters that are not taken on missions will still be making progress. A character that is not healthy may still make some progress. For example, a broken leg will prevent training physical skills, but would allow the character to keep working on mental skills. 

Injury recovery is similar to training at the base. A character will survive a mission as long as they are alive at the point when the “end mission” screen is triggered. In theory we can simulate post-mission death due to injury, but that would be an opt-in for extreme difficulty. Because we track each injury a character suffers, we do healing per-injury. Different injuries can heal at different rates. As they recover, they will automatically resume training as their health allows.

In the case of non-fatal injury to the Commander, if one or more other characters are available, you will be able to designate an acting commanding officer to cover the Commander’s duties and lead the squad on missions until recovery. If no one is available, time will fast forward until the Commander recovers. 

For early access we also wanted to make the full character roster available. So in addition to Ivan, Karsten, Nuri, and Zoe from the demo, you will now have Alexey, Marguerite, Ronda, Shinichi, and Rustam. 

Saving and loading has been implemented. The game will now autosave after each mission at the base. For initial early access saving will be limited to while at base. We will implement saving while on mission later.

2017-05-01.png

We also have been hard at work on the UI. We received a lot of feedback about the look and feel of the UI and have responded with some improvements. Functionally the location of the controls is largely unchanged. What we have done is softened the appearance of the buttons, borders, and dialogs, and replaced some of the radio buttons with icon based sliders that make it easier to visualize how the controls work together.

We published a video for those wanting to see more of the new UI.

One final change for realism and game ballance we’ve made, was to implement the penalties for attacking moving targets. Simply put, it’s harder to hit something that is moving than something that is still. The mechanic implements this is two ways. One, there is a penalty to the circular error probable (CEP) for any given aim time. Two, the moving target limits the amount of time that can be spent aiming. The strength of the penalty is based on how fast the target is crossing the character’s field of view and how far away they are.

The first batches of character voices have started to arrive. Each playable character will have an unique voice and persona which they will use to acknowledge your commands and give you status updates.

The last area of getting ready was the implementation of settings screens. We have made a pass over all the sound effects and broke them into channels so each can have its own volume control (music, ambient sounds, combat sound effects, player character voices). We have also started implementing the settings for difficulty and new game options. These will be exposed soon.

With all these changes, the core engine of Spy DNA is pretty much ready for early access. What we are finishing up now is getting enough of the missions ready that the game has some content to go with the engine. 


 

Early Access roadmap

Spy DNA has received the green light from Steam, meaning that we're still on-track to ship the Early Access release in Q2 2017. Read on to learn what will be in the Early Access version.

6570985235_5dba764294_b.jpg

Platform upgrade

For Early Access release, we have migrated Spy DNA to Unreal Engine 4.15.1, so we can take advantage of all the newest features and improvements that the engine provides.

User interface update

From the demo, you're already familiar with the ability to toggle the first-person view ("body-cam") on and off to improve performance. For the Early Access release, we're planning to change this behavior to toggle between the body-cam and a minimap. So while you will be conserving system resource, the game will be using the now freed-up screen real estate to display tactical information.

A very visible change you will see that we're working on is the UI look-and-feel update. The functionality and layout of the UI will remain mostly unchanged, but many of the text buttons will be replaced with icons, and all UI elements will receive a style update in order to make the game more visually rich.

Work in progress: UI look-and-feel update

Work in progress: UI look-and-feel update

Map edges

To help make the Spy DNA world more immersive, we'll be extending the edges of the map past the area accessible to the player, so that you won't be seeing those hard map edges anymore.

Because we are generating the maps at runtime, it is fairly straightforward to extended the map, but it brings with it a performance trade-off. The area beyond the playable map will be extended a bit, and beyond that point, there will be a fogging effect, to make the map edge less noticeable/distracting.

As originally announces, Spy DNA will supprt three map sizes: 256x256 meters, 512x512, and 1024x1024. To raise or lower the difficulty one notch, each mission map will also be available in one size larger or smaller. This means for the largest map, you'll be able to play on a 2048x2048 meter map for highest difficulty, and for the smallest map, you'll have the option to play on a 128x128 meter map.

Missions

When it comes to selecting who you take with you on the mission, you'll now also have a choice to pick equipment for each individual character.

Every squad member will have a default load-out for each appearance/uniform that they can wear (fancy, field, and casual), and if you edit any of them, the changes will only impact that specific appearance, and the others will remain as they were.

Spy DNA Early Access will also include procedurally-generated missions. In the current demo, we have provided missions that use one of the two map types: either 100% hand-made OR 100% procedural. However, the mission objectives, as well as the NPCs you encounter on those missions are pre-set.

Going forward, storyline missions will use either a hand-made map, or a procedural maps, with predefined objectives and NPCs.

For Early Access, we’re expanding the game to include 100% randomly generated missions, similar to "random encounters." Those missions will have the map, objectives, and NPCs all generated at random, and will pop up in the intelligence screen, to give the player a lot more to do between the storyline missions. They’re going to be optional, but will offer a good opportunity for building skills and advancing your characters.

Finally, we'll be introducing a new mission phase (also optional), called "infiltration." You will be able to use this phase to set up for the main mission (or not; if you prefer to go in guns blazing, without any prep, be our guest). Typical things to do on an "infiltration" mission would be to pre-position characters such as your sniper, hide a weapons cache or plant some surveillance equipment, steal access cards/keys, disable/sabotage the alarm, or general recon.

On such a mission, success is good, but depending on how badly your infiltration fails, you may be changing your main mission objective to rescue your infiltration team.

Let us know in the comments below what you think of these new features and improvements!

Spy DNA has been Greenlit on Steam!

We've made it! In under two weeks, actually.

Alex has always considered thirteen (along with other primes) to be a lucky number. And it sure was a lucky number of days for us to get the Greenlight thumbs-up.

Thank you everyone for voting and for being our supporters as we work on getting Spy DNA ready for you.

Next stop: Early Access. We're shooting for Q2 this year. For now, there's a bunch of paperwork and prep work on Steam, and of course a lot of coding. We'll announce the Early Access launch date when we know it ourselves.

Stay tuned!

Demo prep

We are getting ready for the demo. Today we made a new video from the latest build. This is the first time we’ve shown a play-though from character creation to combat. We’ve been focused on playability over the last few weeks, so we’re fixing lots and lots of smaller issues.

The big task was working through issues with load and save of games. Because the demo takes you through character creation before you can start taking sample missions, we wanted players to be able to save a character they generated. We also implemented a loading screen while working on load game. We hope these additions make the demo more enjoyable for players.

Another significant change from our previous videos is an updated camera system. While watching people play, we found players used three camera positions frequently. So we added direct support for the most common camera uses. 

  • A low camera which shows things from the view of the character
  • A high camera which shows the tactical situation
  • A target camera which flies the camera over to the active target
  • And we still have “free” camera so the player can move it around as they desire

For the low and high camera they save the player's view height and angle so if you switch away and come back you won’t have to reset the camera each time.

We also implemented a compass; it shows which way the character is facing. More interestingly, we also added contact ticks to the compass. So you can see which way contacts are relative to your active character. Also you can click them to fly the camera over to any contact.

The map generation has been heavily tested and we have recently implemented a number of performance enhancements. Currently the large maps can strain some mid-range systems so we put some effort into improving performance. There is more to be done, but we got a very nice performance bump for the demo.

For the playable characters we doubled the number of commander appearances available for the demo. There are two male and two female commanders to choose from, each with their three outfits depending on mission. There will be many more for the shipping game.

The demo will also include default genetic enhancements for all the playable characters. You will get to see a small example of the enhancements in action. In the shipping game you will be able to select and choose how your commander is enhanced to mirror your play style.

We implemented new shaders for the trees, firing range, roof of the base, and a few other items. This was done to make them more friendly to the camera so they cut or blur away so you can continue to see the most important parts of the map.

The status screen has been updated to show not only injuries, but also attacks which were stopped by armor or implants. You can mouse over any hit and see the force and type of attack along with how much of it any armor you may have stopped. 

Movement was reviewed. and walk, jog, and sprint speeds were double checked for the demo. We spent a bit of time graphing the various movement speeds vs attributes. These are the base speeds with zero encumbrance.

Walk speed graph

Walk speed graph

Jog speed graph

Jog speed graph

Sprint speed graph

Sprint speed graph

The jog (max sustained movement speed) graph is 3D because it’s based off both quickness and stamina. This was triggered when we picked up a few too many weapons at the firing range and unintentionally tested our encumbrance system.

Barring any unexpected problems we expect to have the demo out this month. Stay tuned!

Get ready for the demo

The public demo is shipping in February. Learn where to get it and what's inside.

What's inside?

As we are getting close to the first public demo of Spy DNA, we wanted to give you a quick overview of what will be included in the demo release, and where we are with development. Let’s start with some of the major features we want to show.

The demo starts with character creation. On the first play-through, character creation starts with a personality questionnaire. We use the questionnaire to help the players get a set of attributes which are best suited to their play-style. In the shipping game there will be other options for character creation to give the player more direct control over the creation process, but not in the demo. After picking your attributes you are taken to the base.

Upon arrival, the tutorial will start, covering the basics of camera control, character management, and combat. 

The base is where you spend your time between missions. It is located on a small island and features the medical facility, an intel/ops center, scientific research offices, the cryogenic storage vault, and extensive training grounds with a 1000m shooting range and a breach-and-clear area.

Between missions you can use the facilities at the base to heal and train your characters. This is also where you can view and accept available missions and pick the team you will take with you. Each team member has at least two outfits, field and casual, and some (including the Commander) will also have a fancy outfit for blending in with a posher crowd.

For the loners among you, we allow the player not to take any other squad members on the missions and go it alone for an added challenge.

Aside from the base map, all mission maps in the demo will be procedurally generated, to allow for high replayabilty. The demo will include a minimum of five missions, covering several terrain types and times of day.

In summary, here’s what you can expect from the demo release:

  • Character creation
  • UI and HUD tutorial
  • Shooting range to try all the weapons outside of combat situation
  • A minimum of five missions with procedural maps for higher replay value
  • Four playable team member characters to accompany the Commander on missions

Where and how will you get the demo?

When the demo is ready (some time this month!), we will announce it here on the blog, as well as on Twitter, Facebook, GooglePlus, and Tumblr.

The download will be available on RPGmaker.net as well as GameJolt.com and Itch.io (links TBD). The demo will be free to download and play, and we’d love your help in spreading the word about it.

What then?

Once the demo is out the door, and the feedback we get from the community is coming in, we’ll be going to Steam Greenlight. The date of the Greenlight campaign is not yet set in stone, because it’ll depend on whether our demo players will discover any issues that need fixing beforehand.

If you have any questions or ideas, hit us up on social media!